Which is more important in bioimaging SIMS experiments-The sample preparation or the nature of the projectile?

M. E. Kurczy, P. D. Piehowski, S. A. Parry, M. Jiang, Gong Chen, A. G. Ewing, Nicholas Winograd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sample preparation is central to acquiring meaningful molecule-specific images with SIMS, especially when submicron lateral resolution is involved. The issue is to maintain the distribution of target molecules while attempting to introduce biological cells or tissue into the high vacuum environment of the mass spectrometer. Here we compare freeze-drying, freeze-etching, freeze-fracture and trehalose vitrification as possible strategies for these experiments. The results show that the prospects for successful imaging experiments are greatly improved with all of these methods when using cluster ion bombardment, particularly C 60 + ions, not only due to increased sensitivity of this projectiles, but also since it removes contamination overlayers without insult to the underlying chemistry. The emergence of 3-dimensional imaging capabilities also suggests that sample preparation should not perturb the 3-dimensional morphology of the cell, a situation not generally possible during freeze-drying. Hence, sample preparation and projectile type are strongly coupled parameters for bioimaging with mass spectrometry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1298-1304
Number of pages7
JournalApplied Surface Science
Volume255
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2008

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Projectiles
Secondary ion mass spectrometry
Drying
Imaging techniques
Vitrification
Trehalose
Molecules
Mass spectrometers
Ion bombardment
Mass spectrometry
Etching
Contamination
Experiments
Vacuum
Ions
Tissue

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

Kurczy, M. E. ; Piehowski, P. D. ; Parry, S. A. ; Jiang, M. ; Chen, Gong ; Ewing, A. G. ; Winograd, Nicholas. / Which is more important in bioimaging SIMS experiments-The sample preparation or the nature of the projectile?. In: Applied Surface Science. 2008 ; Vol. 255, No. 4. pp. 1298-1304.
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Which is more important in bioimaging SIMS experiments-The sample preparation or the nature of the projectile? / Kurczy, M. E.; Piehowski, P. D.; Parry, S. A.; Jiang, M.; Chen, Gong; Ewing, A. G.; Winograd, Nicholas.

In: Applied Surface Science, Vol. 255, No. 4, 15.12.2008, p. 1298-1304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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