Who should provide genetic education prior to gene testing? Computers and other methods for improving patient understanding

Michael Green, Norman Fost

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As numerous new gene tests are introduced into clinical practice, patients have a growing need for accurate and comprehensive information about the risks and benefits of gene testing. However, in the changing healthcare environment, it is not clear who will provide such information because genetic counselors are scarce and their services are not widely utilized, and primary care providers lack time and expertise in genetics. Interactive computers may help fill the information gap. We review a variety of educational modalities for providing patient education and argue that interactive computers have potential advantages over other educational methods for providing information and promoting informed consent to genetic testing. Finally, some questions for further research are raised.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-136
Number of pages6
JournalGenetic Testing
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Education
Genetic Testing
Patient Education
Informed Consent
Genes
Primary Health Care
Delivery of Health Care
Research
Counselors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

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Who should provide genetic education prior to gene testing? Computers and other methods for improving patient understanding. / Green, Michael; Fost, Norman.

In: Genetic Testing, Vol. 1, No. 2, 01.01.1997, p. 131-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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