Whole-farm models to quantify greenhouse gas emissions and their potential use for linking climate change mitigation and adaptation in temperate grassland ruminant-based farming systems.

A. Del Prado, P. Crosson, J. E. Olesen, Clarence Alan Rotz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The farm level is the most appropriate scale for evaluating options for mitigating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, because the farm represents the unit at which management decisions in livestock production are made. To date, a number of whole farm modelling approaches have been developed to quantify GHG emissions and explore climate change mitigation strategies for livestock systems. This paper analyses the limitations and strengths of the different existing approaches for modelling GHG mitigation by considering basic model structures, approaches for simulating GHG emissions from various farm components and the sensitivity of GHG outputs and mitigation measures to different approaches. Potential challenges for linking existing models with the simulation of impacts and adaptation measures under climate change are explored along with a brief discussion of the effects on other ecosystem services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)373-385
Number of pages13
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume7 Suppl 2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Climate Change
Ruminants
greenhouse gas emissions
Agriculture
ruminants
farming systems
grasslands
Gases
climate change
farms
greenhouse gases
Livestock
livestock production
ecosystem services
livestock
Ecosystem
Grassland
Farms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

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Whole-farm models to quantify greenhouse gas emissions and their potential use for linking climate change mitigation and adaptation in temperate grassland ruminant-based farming systems. / Del Prado, A.; Crosson, P.; Olesen, J. E.; Rotz, Clarence Alan.

In: Unknown Journal, Vol. 7 Suppl 2, 01.01.2013, p. 373-385.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T1 - Whole-farm models to quantify greenhouse gas emissions and their potential use for linking climate change mitigation and adaptation in temperate grassland ruminant-based farming systems.

AU - Del Prado, A.

AU - Crosson, P.

AU - Olesen, J. E.

AU - Rotz, Clarence Alan

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