Why Do Individuals Seek Conversion Therapy? The Role of Religiosity, Internalized Homonegativity, and Identity Development

Erinn E. Tozer, Jeffrey A. Hayes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

61 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the potential influence of religiosity, sexual orientation identity development, and internalized homonegativity on the propensity to seek conversion therapy to change one's sexual orientation. An Internet sample of 76 women and 130 men who were gay-identified, lesbian-identified, same-sex attracted, and “questioning” was studied. Results indicated that two types of religious orientations, intrinsic and quest, predicted a propensity to seek conversion therapy, although in different directions. Further more, internalized homonegativity fully mediated the relationships between religious orientation and propensity to seek conversion therapy. Additionally, there was a significant inverse relationship between sexual orientation identity development and propensity to seek conversion therapy. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)716-740
Number of pages25
JournalThe Counseling Psychologist
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

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