Witches, goddesses, and angry spirits: The politics of spiritual liberation in African diaspora women’s fiction

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

Witches, Goddesses and Angry Spirits: The Politics of Spiritual Liberation in African Diaspora Women’s Fiction explores African diaspora religious practices as vehicles for Africana women’s spiritual transformation, using representative fictions by three contemporary writers of the African Americas who compose fresh models of female spirituality: Breath, Eyes, Memory (1994) by Haitian American novelist Edwidge Danticat; Paradise (1998) by African American Nobel laureate Toni Morrison; and I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem (1992) by Guadeloupean author Maryse Condé.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherOhio State University Press
Number of pages181
ISBN (Electronic)9780814270158
ISBN (Print)9780814212196
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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