Wives and husbands: Social class, gender, and class identification in the U.S

John F. Zipp, Eric Plutzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two decades after Joan Acker (1973) castigated mainstream stratification research for its 'intellectual sexism', the debate over the impact that married women's paid employment has on class analysis is perhaps the most controversial issue in social stratification. Using two decades of survey data from the U.S., we assess the conditions under which wife's class affects the class identification of both spouses. Our principal findings include: (a) although the class positions of both spouses have an impact on class identification, husband's class is more important; (b) the explanatory power of wife's class does not appear to depend on gender inequality for men but does so for women; and (c) in certain situations, wife's class significantly modifies or reverses the class leanings expected on the basis of husband's position.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)235-252
Number of pages18
JournalSociology
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

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class identification
social class
husband
wife
gender
spouse
class position
women's employment
social stratification
sexism

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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Wives and husbands : Social class, gender, and class identification in the U.S. / Zipp, John F.; Plutzer, Eric.

In: Sociology, Vol. 30, No. 2, 01.01.1996, p. 235-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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