Women's home-centred work in India: The gendered politics of space

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The increase in poorly paid home-centred work has become a global phenomenon. In India, social restrictions on women's spatial mobility reduce their job options and make home-centred work one of the few viable income-earning alternatives for women from low-income groups. At the some time research illustrates the importance of the interplay between spatial relations and social action/political mobilisation. This article examines the role of socio-spatial relations in explaining the exploitative nature of women's home-centred work through the qualitative case study of three low-income settlements in Kolkata, India. The study illustrates that the most spatially restrictive type of home-centred work, piece-rated work, is also the least remunerated and affords almost no empowerment potential. Based on the findings, the article calls for a multi-pronged intervention strategy at the neighbourhood level to improve the living conditions of home-centred workers, expand their job prospects, and provide opportunities for long-term empowerment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)271-298
Number of pages28
JournalInternational Development Planning Review
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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politics
income
empowerment
India
low income
mobilization
intervention strategy
living conditions
woman
worker
Group
living condition
spatial mobility

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development

Cite this

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Women's home-centred work in India : The gendered politics of space. / Bose, Mallika.

In: International Development Planning Review, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.01.2007, p. 271-298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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