Work and Family Issues in the Hospitality Industry: Perspectives of Entrants, Managers, and Spouses

Jeanette N. Cleveland, John W. O'Neill, Jodi L. Himelright, Michelle M. Harrison, Ann C. Crouter, Robert Drago

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

79 Scopus citations

Abstract

With smaller, more efficient workforces, hotel organizations are competing to retain highly valued managers. Work stress and burnout are often cited as precursors to work and family stress, and together these factors influence employee intentions to leave an organization. However, work and family issues have received little attention in the hospitality and tourism literature. Using focus groups and semistructured interviews with three groups of participants (new entrants into the hotel industry, hotel managers, and their spouses), the authors explore the connections among work characteristics, work stress, and the work-family interface. Results of the multisource qualitative research suggest that long, unpredictable hours create individual and family-related stress. Furthermore, there is agreement among the three sources regarding the stressors and benefits associated with working in the hotel industry. Discussion of future research and practice is presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-298
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Hospitality and Tourism Research
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management

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