Work and organisation engagement: aligning research and practice

Elaine Farndale, Susanne E. Beijer, Marc J.P.M. Van Veldhoven, Clare Kelliher, Veronica Hope-Hailey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose – To date, work engagement has been the domain of academics whilst organisation engagement has been the focus of practice. The purpose of this paper is to address the growing divide by exploring the construct clarity and discriminant validity of work and organisation engagement simultaneously, providing insight into how these constructs relate empirically, as well as investigating the nomological network of each. Design/methodology/approach – Empirical data were collected through online surveys from 298 employees in two multinational companies. Respondents were primarily managerial and professional employees. The survey included measures of work and organisation engagement, as well as work outcomes and organisation performance. Findings – The findings indicate that work and organisation engagement are distinct constructs, and have differential relationships with important employee outcomes (commitment, organisational citizenship behaviour, initiative, active learning, job satisfaction), and organisational performance. Practical implications – The findings provide opportunities for practitioners to explore the potentially unique ways in which different types of engagement may add value to jobs and organisations. Originality/value – The study takes important steps in bridging the academic/practitioner divide: the paper clearly demonstrates how the two concepts of work and organisation engagement relate to and complement each other as useful constructs for research and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-176
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Organizational Effectiveness
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 27 2014

Fingerprint

Employees
Organizational performance
Empirical data
Online survey
Discriminant validity
Organizational citizenship behavior
Design methodology
Multinational companies
Work outcomes
Work engagement
Job satisfaction
Active learning
Construct validity
Work organization

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

Farndale, Elaine ; E. Beijer, Susanne ; J.P.M. Van Veldhoven, Marc ; Kelliher, Clare ; Hope-Hailey, Veronica. / Work and organisation engagement : aligning research and practice. In: Journal of Organizational Effectiveness. 2014 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 157-176.
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Farndale, E, E. Beijer, S, J.P.M. Van Veldhoven, M, Kelliher, C & Hope-Hailey, V 2014, 'Work and organisation engagement: aligning research and practice', Journal of Organizational Effectiveness, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 157-176. https://doi.org/10.1108/JOEPP-03-2014-0015

Work and organisation engagement : aligning research and practice. / Farndale, Elaine; E. Beijer, Susanne; J.P.M. Van Veldhoven, Marc; Kelliher, Clare; Hope-Hailey, Veronica.

In: Journal of Organizational Effectiveness, Vol. 1, No. 2, 27.05.2014, p. 157-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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