Work-family supportiveness organizational perceptions: Important for the well-being of male blue-collar hourly workers?

Alicia A. Grandey, Bryanne L. Cordeiro, Judd H. Michael

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study questions whether organizational perceptions of family supportiveness predict work-family conflict (WFC) and job satisfaction for an atypical sample of male hourly workers in a manufacturing organization, and whether those relationships depend on work (number of work hours) and family (number of family roles) demands. A unidimensional factor structure for the family supportiveness scale was not found; however a subscale for the extent that the organization supported work-family balance was strongly related to WFC and job satisfaction. An interaction was found such that those working long hours in the family-supportive work environment had lower WFC than those working long hours in an unsupportive environment, while the number of family roles (e.g., spouse, parent, eldercare) had no moderating effects. Supporting employees' non-work life is determined to be important for these employees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)460-478
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Vocational Behavior
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

Fingerprint

family work
well-being
worker
job satisfaction
employee
work-family balance
organization
Job Satisfaction
work environment
spouse
manufacturing
parents
Blue-collar workers
Well-being
Work-family
Work-family conflict
interaction
Spouses
Employees
Job satisfaction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

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abstract = "The current study questions whether organizational perceptions of family supportiveness predict work-family conflict (WFC) and job satisfaction for an atypical sample of male hourly workers in a manufacturing organization, and whether those relationships depend on work (number of work hours) and family (number of family roles) demands. A unidimensional factor structure for the family supportiveness scale was not found; however a subscale for the extent that the organization supported work-family balance was strongly related to WFC and job satisfaction. An interaction was found such that those working long hours in the family-supportive work environment had lower WFC than those working long hours in an unsupportive environment, while the number of family roles (e.g., spouse, parent, eldercare) had no moderating effects. Supporting employees' non-work life is determined to be important for these employees.",
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