Work stress and well-being in the hotel industry

John W. O'Neill, Kelly Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Employee stress is a significant issue in the hospitality industry, and it is costly for employers and employees alike. Although addressing and reducing stress is both a noble goal and is capable of resulting in expense reductions for employers, the nature and quantity of hospitality employee stress is not fully understood. The first aim of this study was to identify common work stressors in a sample of 164 managerial and hourly workers employed at 65 different hotels who were each interviewed for eight consecutive days. The two most common stressors were interpersonal tensions at work and overloads (e.g., technology not functioning). The second aim was to determine whether there were differences in the types and frequency of work stressors by job type (i.e., managers versus non-managers), gender, and marital status. Hotel managers reported significantly more stressors than hourly employees. There were no significant differences by gender or marital status. The third aim was to investigate whether the various stressors were linked to hotel employee health and work outcomes. More employee and coworker stressors were linked to more negative physical health symptoms. Also, interpersonal tensions at work were linked to lower job satisfaction and greater turnover intentions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)385-390
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Hospitality Management
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2011

Fingerprint

gender
turnover
health
marital status
hotel industry
Work stress
Hotel industry
Well-being
Employees
Stressors
hospitality industry
Employers
Work stressors
Marital status

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

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Work stress and well-being in the hotel industry. / O'Neill, John W.; Davis, Kelly.

In: International Journal of Hospitality Management, Vol. 30, No. 2, 01.06.2011, p. 385-390.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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