Work stress, sleep deficiency, and predicted 10-year cardiometabolic risk in a female patient care worker population

Henrik B. Jacobsen, Silje E. Reme, Grace Sembajwe, Karen Hopcia, Tore C. Stiles, Glorian Sorensen, James H. Porter, Miguel Marino, Orfeu M. Buxton

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Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the longitudinal effect of work-related stress, sleep deficiency, and physical activity on 10-year cardiometabolic risk among an all-female worker population. Methods: Data on patient care workers (n=99) was collected 2 years apart. Baseline measures included: job stress, physical activity, night work, and sleep deficiency. Biomarkers and objective measurements were used to estimate 10-year cardiometabolic risk at follow-up. Significant associations (P<0.05) from baseline analyses were used to build a multivariable linear regression model. Results: The participants were mostly white nurses with a mean age of 41 years. Adjusted linear regression showed that having sleep maintenance problems, a different occupation than nurse, and/or not exercising at recommended levels at baseline increased the 10-year cardiometabolic risk at follow-up. Conclusions: In female workers prone to work-related stress and sleep deficiency, maintaining sleep and exercise patterns had a strong impact on modifiable 10-year cardiometabolic risk. Am. J. Ind. Med. 57:940-949, 2014.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)940-949
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume57
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Jacobsen, H. B., Reme, S. E., Sembajwe, G., Hopcia, K., Stiles, T. C., Sorensen, G., Porter, J. H., Marino, M., & Buxton, O. M. (2014). Work stress, sleep deficiency, and predicted 10-year cardiometabolic risk in a female patient care worker population. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 57(8), 940-949. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajim.22340