Workplace Flexibility and Worker Well-Being by Gender

Jaeseung Kim, Julia R. Henly, Lonnie M. Golden, Susan J. Lambert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The study examines the associations between two distinct forms of workplace flexibility—flexible schedules and working at home—and workers' well-being, with special attention to the distinct reasons for working at home and gender differences. Background: Workplace flexibility can be a key resource to manage work and family responsibilities. However, there are gaps in knowledge regarding the types of flexibility that provide either a benefit or disadvantage for workers. In particular, insufficient attention has been paid to different reasons employees have for working at home and their implications. Method: Using the General Social Survey, we created a pooled sample across the four waves of data (2002, 2006, 2010, and 2014, N = 6,945). Workers' well-being was measured with job satisfaction, job stress, daily fatigue, and work-to-family conflict. Multivariate regression analysis and several sensitivity tests were conducted. Results: The study found benefits of flexible schedules for work-related well-being. Working at home as part of one's job had some benefits, but working at home to catch up on work had consistent disadvantages for worker well-being. Moreover, the ability to adjust start and end times of work and working at home to catch up on work were associated with elevated work-to-family conflict, particularly for female workers. Conclusion: The findings suggest the potential advantages and unintended consequences of different flexibility arrangements for workers, and these implications may differ by gender.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Marriage and Family
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

flexibility
workplace
well-being
worker
gender
female worker
Workers
Well-being
Work Place
job satisfaction
fatigue
multivariate analysis
gender-specific factors
regression analysis
employee
responsibility
ability
resources

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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title = "Workplace Flexibility and Worker Well-Being by Gender",
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Workplace Flexibility and Worker Well-Being by Gender. / Kim, Jaeseung; Henly, Julia R.; Golden, Lonnie M.; Lambert, Susan J.

In: Journal of Marriage and Family, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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