'Would I be able to ...'? Teaching clients to assess the availability of their community living life style preferences

R. M. Foxx, G. D. Faw, S. Taylor, P. K. Davis, R. Fulia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A three-phase program was developed to involve six institutionalized adults with mild mental retardation in their transition to community living. In Phase I, subjects were interviewed to determine their community living life style preferences and were found to be reliable and skillful in stating their preferences. In Phase II, the subjects' 10 strongest preferences were identified. In Phase III, they were taught to obtain preference availability information from group home representatives and report these findings to their social worker. A simultaneous replication design across two component skills, questioning and reporting, revealed that both increased after training and generalized to community group homes. The 5 subjects available for follow-up maintained their posttraining performance. Implications of these results in extending choice and decision-making technology were discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)235-248
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Journal on Mental Retardation
Volume98
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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life style
Group Homes
Life Style
Teaching
community
Intellectual Disability
Decision Making
Technology
social worker
Group
decision making
Lifestyle
performance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Rehabilitation
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Foxx, R. M. ; Faw, G. D. ; Taylor, S. ; Davis, P. K. ; Fulia, R. / 'Would I be able to ...'? Teaching clients to assess the availability of their community living life style preferences. In: American Journal on Mental Retardation. 1993 ; Vol. 98, No. 2. pp. 235-248.
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'Would I be able to ...'? Teaching clients to assess the availability of their community living life style preferences. / Foxx, R. M.; Faw, G. D.; Taylor, S.; Davis, P. K.; Fulia, R.

In: American Journal on Mental Retardation, Vol. 98, No. 2, 01.01.1993, p. 235-248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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