Young female soccer players' perceptions of their modified sport environment

Michelle McCalpin, Blair Evans, Jean Côté

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Competitive engineering is a process whereby sport organizations modify the rules, facilities, and equipment involved in sport to facilitate desirable athlete outcomes and experiences. Competitive engineering is being increasingly adopted by youth sport organizations with empirical evidence positively supporting its influence on skill development and performance. The purpose of this study was to explore young female athletes' experiences in their modified soccer environment. Seventeen recreational and competitive soccer players, aged 8-11, participated in semistructured photo elicitation interviews that featured several visual qualitative methods (i.e., athlete-directed photography, drawing exercises, and pile-sorting) to facilitate insight on their sport environments. Results revealed that the athletes' competitively engineered soccer experience was perceived as being a distinct environment that emphasized personal development, positive relationships, and the underlying enjoyment of sport. These findings shed light of how youth sport structure modifications influence the athletes' experiences, providing practical implications to further promote positive youth sport experiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-77
Number of pages13
JournalSport Psychologist
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

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Soccer
Athletes
Sports
Photography
Interviews
Exercise
Equipment and Supplies
Youth Sports

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

McCalpin, Michelle ; Evans, Blair ; Côté, Jean. / Young female soccer players' perceptions of their modified sport environment. In: Sport Psychologist. 2017 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 65-77.
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Young female soccer players' perceptions of their modified sport environment. / McCalpin, Michelle; Evans, Blair; Côté, Jean.

In: Sport Psychologist, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.03.2017, p. 65-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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