Youths' Substance Use and Changes in Parental Knowledge-Related Behaviors During Middle School: A Person-Oriented Approach

Melissa A. Lippold, Mark T. Greenberg, Linda Marie Collins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parental knowledge is a key protective factor for youths' risky behavior. Little is known about how longitudinal combinations of knowledge-related behaviors are associated with youths' substance use. This longitudinal study uses Latent Transition Analysis to identify latent patterns of parental knowledge-related behaviors occurring in mother-youth dyads during middle school and to investigate how changes in knowledge-related patterns are associated with youths' substance use in Grade 6 and the initiation of substance use from Grade 6 to 8. Using a sample of 536 rural dyads (53 % female, 84 % White), we assessed mother and youths' reports of parental knowledge, active parental monitoring efforts, youth disclosure, and parent-youth communication to identify six latent patterns of knowledge-related behaviors: High Monitors, Low Monitors, Communication-Focused, Supervision-Focused, Maternal Over-Estimators, and Youth Over-Estimators. Fifty percent or more of dyads in the High Monitors, Communication-Focused and Youth Over-Estimators were in the same status in both 6th and 8th grade: 98 % of Low Monitors in Grade 6 were also in this status in Grade 8. The initiation of alcohol, smoking, and marijuana was associated significantly with transitions between patterns of knowledge-related behaviors. The initiation of alcohol and smoking were associated with increased odds of transitions into the Low Monitors from the Communication-Focused, Supervision-Focused, and Maternal Over-Estimators. However, the initiation of substance use was associated with decreased odds of transitions from the High Monitors to the Low Monitors and with increased odds of transitions from High Monitors to Supervision-Focused. The discussion focuses on the value of using a person-oriented dyadic approach with multiple reporters to study changes in knowledge-related behaviors over the middle school period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)729-744
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of youth and adolescence
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

human being
school grade
Communication
dyad
Mothers
supervision
communication
smoking
alcohol
Marijuana Smoking
Alcohols
reporter
Disclosure
Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study
parents
Smoking
monitoring

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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abstract = "Parental knowledge is a key protective factor for youths' risky behavior. Little is known about how longitudinal combinations of knowledge-related behaviors are associated with youths' substance use. This longitudinal study uses Latent Transition Analysis to identify latent patterns of parental knowledge-related behaviors occurring in mother-youth dyads during middle school and to investigate how changes in knowledge-related patterns are associated with youths' substance use in Grade 6 and the initiation of substance use from Grade 6 to 8. Using a sample of 536 rural dyads (53 {\%} female, 84 {\%} White), we assessed mother and youths' reports of parental knowledge, active parental monitoring efforts, youth disclosure, and parent-youth communication to identify six latent patterns of knowledge-related behaviors: High Monitors, Low Monitors, Communication-Focused, Supervision-Focused, Maternal Over-Estimators, and Youth Over-Estimators. Fifty percent or more of dyads in the High Monitors, Communication-Focused and Youth Over-Estimators were in the same status in both 6th and 8th grade: 98 {\%} of Low Monitors in Grade 6 were also in this status in Grade 8. The initiation of alcohol, smoking, and marijuana was associated significantly with transitions between patterns of knowledge-related behaviors. The initiation of alcohol and smoking were associated with increased odds of transitions into the Low Monitors from the Communication-Focused, Supervision-Focused, and Maternal Over-Estimators. However, the initiation of substance use was associated with decreased odds of transitions from the High Monitors to the Low Monitors and with increased odds of transitions from High Monitors to Supervision-Focused. The discussion focuses on the value of using a person-oriented dyadic approach with multiple reporters to study changes in knowledge-related behaviors over the middle school period.",
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Youths' Substance Use and Changes in Parental Knowledge-Related Behaviors During Middle School : A Person-Oriented Approach. / Lippold, Melissa A.; Greenberg, Mark T.; Collins, Linda Marie.

In: Journal of youth and adolescence, Vol. 43, No. 5, 01.01.2014, p. 729-744.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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